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An ATARI magazine 



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50, 




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ISSUE ONE 



DECEMBER/JANUARY 1982 






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INSIDE... 



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VULTURES! 

New Graphics Modes 

Latest Software 



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ATARI 188 

Games & Programs 

Cassette 1 - Galaxy Trek 

Cassette 2^ He xa pawn, Noughts & 
Crosses and Tower 
of Brahma 

Cassette 3~ King, Magicians Caves 

Cassette 4- Maze, Robot Chase and 
Mugwump 

Cassette 5- Numerical Integration, 
Solving Simultaneous 
Equations, Best Fit Poly- 
nomial 

All cassettes £4,95 each 
SPECIAL OFFER: 3 for £12.95 

5 for £19.95 

Mr, M.Ward, 9, St, Andrews Avenue, 
Crewe, Cheshire, CW2 6JJ 



Your friendly 
Pro fessional 

Printer- 



^^^^MHM 




YEARS 




1883-1983 



Birbeck and Sons Ltd. 

26-28 Fleet Street * Birmingham B31JY 
0212364602 










iTM 



An ATARI magazine 




CONTENTS 



ISSUE 1 



DEC/JAN 1982 



EDITORIAL. 4 



-■»»* + + +■ I lii 



NEWS 

SECRET CODE........... .„ Les Ellingham 

ADVENTURE... AMERICA Jeff Woodward 

VULTURES M Stan Ockers 

MORE GRAPHICS MODES Colin Boswell 

WHAT'S NEW... Geoff Brown 

ATARI ATTRACTS Phil Griffin 

SOFTWARE REVIEWS „..,„„ 15 

FIRST STEPS Mike Reynolds-Jones 17 

CLUB CALL......... 18 



5 

6 
8 
9 
11 
12 
14 



PAGE 6 

Word processing by M .W. S. Ltd. 
Printed by Birbeck & Sons Ltd. 
Published by B.U.G. 



Editor 

Editorial Offices 



Les Ellingham 

Tel. 0785 41153 

(Evenings) 



Thanks to. .,,.J*ff Woodward , Graham Bennett, 
Mike Reynolds-Jonss , David Sarpy, Phil Griffin, 
Geoff Brown, Miks Aston, Mike Woodroffe, 
Mike Dunn, Colin Boswell, Andrew Jones, 

Peter Fr&ney , Howard Jonas for ihsir 

d07itributions or help. Apologies to anyone I 
may have miassd. 



Subscriptions to PAGE 6 are 
available from: 

PAGE 6, 18 .Underwood Close, 
Parkside, Stafford 

1 year (6 issues) £3.75 

Single copies 65p inc. p. a p. 

Cheques etc. payable to B.U.G, 

PAGE 6 is published bi-monthly 



/ \ 

B ATARI is a registered trademark 
of Atari, Inc. All references 
should be so noted 



^ 



) 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



Anew Atari magazine! 



Welcome to issue 1 of PAS! 6. The 
magazine has been put together by a group 
of Atari enthusiasts who came together as 
the Birmingham User Group, the largest 
independent Atari Computer Club in this 
country to hold regular meetings. I was 
appointed Newsletter Editor but quickly 
realised that we could produce a good 
guality magazine that could be enjoyed by 
Atari enthusiasts throughout the country. 
This first issue has involved a 
considerable effort by a small group of 
people and the Editor in particular to 
try and establish a magazine that Atari 
enthusiasts everywhere could be proud of. 
I hope we have succeeded - tell us what 
you think. 

The future of the magazine is now in 
your hands - the content of the next 
issues needs to be supplied by YOU - the 
readers. Articles, programs, views, 
letters and all contributions are 
invited. We are not a profit-making 
organisation and therefore cannot 
normally pay for articles but by 
contributing you will benefit from an 
ever improving magazine which will help 
you get maximum enjoyment out of your 
Atari computer. With your help, PAGE 6 
will become THE Atari magazine. 



JUST A GAMES MACHINE ? 

One of the aims of page 6 will be to 
tell people that the Atari 400 and 800 
are home COMPUTERS. True they are 
excellent games machines - the best - but 
an image has grown up that that is all 
they are. Atari themselves seem to be 
happy with this situation so it is up to 
Atari enthusiasts to change the image. 
PAGE 6 will, through its pages, tell 
people what these machines can REALLY do. 
Games will have their place in the 
magazine of course, but we will also 
explore business and education and other 
subjects. Many people will buy Atari 
con^uters this Christmas and will then 
find that they have no-one to turn to 
when they want to learn computing. None 



of the general U.K. computing magazines 
are of much help and PAGE 6 will welcome 
new owners as well as old hands. If you 
believe in Atari, tell your friends and 
when they have bought their computer tell 
them about PAGE 6. Better still tell 
them about PAGE 6 first so that they can 
begin straight away to enjoy Atari 
computing . 

PAGE 6 will be your magazine - if you 
want it. Write and tell me what you 
think of the first issue - do you really 
need an Atari magazine? If you do, take 
out a subscription or persuade your local 
dealer to stock PAGE 6. As our 
distribution grows the magazine will get 
bigger and better. 

I would like to thank all those who 
contributed to this issue and in 
particular my wife who provided many 
hours of help (voluntarily') , 



And finally.. .thanks to Clive Thomason 
without whose efforts B.U.G. would have 
not been founded and PAGE 6 would not 
have been born. 



WHY PAGE 6 ? 

Old hands at Atari programming will 
already know the answer. We wanted a 
name for the magazine that you could 
easily remember, but more importantly one 
that would specifically indicate that the 
magazine was for Atari computers. For 
those who don't know, the memory inside 
your Atari is arranged in 'pages'. Each 
page holds 256 memory locations which 
contain the information necessary to make 
things work. Page 6 is a location from 
decimal address 1536 which is set aside 
as a protected memory area for the user. 
The most common use is for short machine 
language routines for use in your Basic 
program. If you don't know about page 6 
yet, keep reading PAGE 6, you'll soon 
learn. 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



News 



Atari slashes prices again" The 800 

has had a massive £100 price cut bringing 
the R.R.P to £399.99 including Basic. 
Time to trade in? 



Latest availability rumours,-.-, are that 
early December will see the last shipment 
of 400 's to retailers this year and 
supplies are short. Seems that somebody 
thought that we wouldn't be spending any 
money this Christmas I 



Atari will be bringing out a BOM 
Cartridge of Defender early next year 
which looks excellent. There are rumours 
however that an even better version has 
been written, but Atari has the rights I 

spinnaker is a new range of educational 
software that has been specially 
developed to help youngsters learn while 
having fun. It will be distributed here 
very shortly by Calisto Software Ltd. 



A couple of books to look out for early 
next year are Compute's Book of Atari 
Graphics and Computer Animation Primer 
published by BY/TE/McGraw - Hill Books. 
The Compute! book promises to be very 
interesting whilst Computer Animation 
Primer contains some excellent Atari 
material^ particularly featuring GTIA. No 
news yet as to availability but we hope 
to review both books as soon as they are 
available in the U.K. 



PAGE 6 hopes to extend the idea of 
•Public Domain 1 programs to this country. 
Certain authors in the States are happy 
to allow their programs to be published 
and used or amended by all. The only 
proviso is that you cannot sell them and 
should give due credit when they are 
used. Let us hope this splendid idea 
catches on - we look forward to hearing 
from all budding authors and programmers 
out there - share your ideas with other 
Atari Enthusiasts. 



Scott Adams comes to U.K. 



Adventure International (UK) Ltd. , is to 
be set up in mid January by Mike 
Wbodroffe of Calisto Computers Ltd. Ihe 
company will be based in Birmingham and 
will have full facilities for 
manufacturing the entire range of 
Adventure International Software. Hie 
packaging will still be brought in from 
America but the tapes and disks will be 
manufactured here meaning that for the 
first time U.K. users will be able to buy 
software at a price compatible with the 
U.S price. Only VAT will need to be 
added to what should be a straight 
sterling - dollar equivalent. 

In addition to manufacturing there will 
be an in-house software development team 
to develop and market ' home-grown ' 
software. As well as developing their 
own software they will be offering 
facilities for users to submit programs 
for possible inclusion in their range 
with good royalties and the chance of 



full distribution both here and In the 
States. This will be the first major 
opportunity for UK written software to be 
distributed on a major scale in the 
U.S.A. 

There will of course be full technical 
back-up for all Adventure International 
products and the latest programs should 
be available at the same time they are 
released in the States, The U.K. has up 
to now been slow to develop the software 
side of the business for the major home 
computers but this new venture should 
bring an enormous surge of interest. 



Scott Adams himself will be coming to 
the U.K. shortly for a promotional tour 
and we look forward to welcoming one of 
the most well known 'names' in the 
computing world. PAGE 6 will be bringing 
you an interview if we can tie him down 
long enough! 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



SECRET CODE 



16 K 



Les El ling ham 



Secret Code is the classic Codebreaker 
or Mastermind type program. 

Hie computer will choose a number using 
the digits 1 to 9 and your task is to 
work out the mystery number using your 
powers of deduction. You may choose the 
length of the number - 3 f 4 or 5 digits - 
and can play alone or with another 
player. With two players you will both 
be trying to guess the sane number so 
don't give too much away I Enter your 
guess by choosing a series of numbers 
from the keyboard. If you make an error 
before the last number press the space 
bar twice to erase the line. Each time 
you enter your guess you will be given 
clues on whether your number is right. 
You will see a '1* for each number which 
is right and in the right place and a "0 1 
for each number which is right but in the 
wrong place. If nothing is shown, none 
of your numbers are right. You have TEN 
guesses- If you run out the mystery 
number will be revealed. To go on to the 
next numbet press any key except SPACE, 
Press SPACE to start afresh. 



1 REfl $*^a^^c^^^^^^*^***t**** 

2 hLfi # * 

3 REfl % SECRET CODE -*- 

4 REfl % by * 

6 REP1 * # 

7 Rti'i # L*s En mghao* t 

8 REH $ * 

9 REN \,.-^Z-.i.'j.;i.&:&&fr 

10 01 ft PL3 : < 1 2 > f Z$< 1 5 > * S*< 7 > m PT^; 7 > > S$C 5 > 
#f#4*< 5 >*M*< 5 >*S< 2 ■' 

15 OPEN #i*4*0* ,l »<: w 

28 REH t&& TITLES #** 

38 GRAPHICS 2+16S9ETCOL0R 4*10*5:SETCOLO 

40 POSITION 4*5:? #6* "SECRET CODE " : 60SU8 
740 

5a 6RRFHICS 2+16S3ETC0L0R 4*18*5:SETC0L0 
R S*13*8:SETC0L0R 1*0*0 

6U rOfi X=20 TO 245 

e? v=v+i:if v>ie then v=e 

79 Pud I T I ON INK RNIK >$ 1 8 >+ 1 # I NT< RND< >t 
10^+1 = ? #6 i 1 MR RND< )£S >+ 1 

7b if Y*18 THEN SOUND 0,X,1O*3 

80 NEXT X: SOUND 0*8* @*@: 60SUB 730 

96 FOR ht=l TO 6: POSITION 6*2+As? #6*" 
''iNEXT H 



L 80 PCS I T I ON 7 #4: ? #6 i CHR3X 17 j * CHR*< 2 1 > * 

CHR*C iS )*CHR*< 23 >*CHR*<: 17 > 

U0 GQSUB 750. 

L 28 POS IT ION 7*7: ? #6*CHR*< 25 > ; CHR$< 13 > i 

CHR*< IS >*CHR£< 17 >*CHR*< 22 > 

L3G buSuB 750JQOSUB 728 

170 POSITION 7,7=? #6*CHR*t 17):60SUB 750 

172 POSITION 8*7:? #6;CHR*<21 ):GOSUB 756 

174 POSITION 9*7:? #6*CHft*< 19>:G0SUB 758 

L7b POSITION 10,7:? #6iCHR*<23>:G0SUB 75 



L i'S POS IT ION 1 1 #?: ? *6 *CHR*< 17): SOSUB 75 

a 

IS'. SOSUB 800: SOSUB 7 20 

20R REfl %** GflrlE OPTIONS ETC. *** 

21*? GRAPHICS 0:POKE 752* i : SET COLOR 4*ly* 

5:SETC0LGR 2*10*5 

23b FOR H=i 10 t5-Z*<fl>= H "iNEXT ft 

236 FOR fi=l TO 2: S< fl >=8: NEXT ft 



240 
RS" 






: POSITION 



*■_>■ 



"HON P1RNV NUflBE 



s!45 POSITION 7*6*? :: <3.4 *r 5>"f: 

INPUT NslF N<3 OR N>5 THEN 60 TO 245 
25b POSITION ?*3i? J1 H0H rlHNV PLAYERS" 



POSITION 7*9= 



< 1 or- ZY 



INPUT HP i IF NP<1 OR NP>2 THEN GOTO 255 
266 POSITION 7*125? "PLAYERS NAPES? 11 
265 FOR fl=i TO NP: POSITION S-13+ft:? fla". 
"i^INPUT PL*: IF LEN<PL*»7 THEN PL*=PL 

27t IF LEN':PLt>=0 THEN PL*=" " 

275 Z$<- ft#7-LEN< PL$ >+ 1 > fi*7 >*PL* : NEXT fi 

290 GOSUB 715 

300 REH %%& \%\1H GfllTE #£# 

31L SfiHPHICS 1+16! SET COLOR 4*12*6 

3H FCfR 0=1 TO N 

3 i 3 0$'.; b *& ;-STR$t I NT< RNDX >^3 >+ 1 > 

314 NEX1 

315 T=3iF0R h=1 rO 7:PT*(fl>=" "sNEXT fl 
320 SETCOLQft @*0*i4sSETCOLOR 1*0*0 

32::. SETCOLOR 2*0,0 

330 POSITION 2*0: FOR H=l TO Ni? #61"?",: 
NEXT h 

35*o FOR PT=l rO NP:S*=Z*<PT*7-6#PT*7) 
360 FOR fl=l TO LEMC S* >: IF ftSC< S*< 3 > X >32 
THEN PT*=S*<ft*?)!60T0 370 

3S5 NEXT H 

370 POSITION 3*0:? #6,PT*i" 

375 POSITION 2*T:? #SjCHR*<31> 

"jciO G0SU8 500 

385 T=T+2 

38, IF 1=23 THEN SOTO 900 

3S€f POSITION 2,T=? #6*CHR*<31> 

4ii)0 NEXT PT:G0TQ 356 

506 REfi *%£ GUESS & COflF^RE SUBROUTINE 

5 iO FOR U-l TO N 

520 SET #1,R:IF K=32 THEN 216 

52^ IF K032 WND K<49 OR K>57 THEN 526 

525 IF K=32 THEN POSITION fl+l*TS? #6; ll 

S60T0 510 
530 POSITION fi+l*T:? #6*CHR*<K+L23> 
540 flN*< ft m fi >=STR$< K-4S ) 
5-dO riEXF ft 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 






56y IF rtN*=S* THEN PiJSLTION 3/HFOR B=l 
TO LENt G£ ) : ? #8 j CHR*< i 7 > * ; NEXT B : ©OTO 56 

c 

56 i >S0T0 5^0 

562 POSITION 2,6: FOR fl=i TO LFM8*>s? #6 
* CHR*< flSC< e$ c; ft , ft J >-32 > j s NEXT H 

563 S(Pi )=SXPT>K 
GOSUB 880:6QTG 936 

POSITION 9, T 

FOR A=i TO LEhKW$) 

IF flSC<HH$<H*H>)=flS£XN*<hl*fi>> THEN H 



585 
57l. 
575 
5&y 

bOt! NtXT ft 

605 POSITION i4*T 

610 FOR H=i TO LENCM*) 

82£ FOR 6=i TO L£>KH$) 

IF ftSCXflN*<fl J ft>>sftSC<H*CB,B>> THEN H 



HN$<ft,ft)="H J 



#S*CHR*<i77>* 



b3ti 

HP :;h,h >=■■>; " 

OTO 688 
650 htv^T P 
660 NEXT ft 
670 RETURN 
780 REN £&& 
710 FOR ft=i 



m< B*B >=" V" : ? #6 *CHR-K 73 ), ;S 



*3Sat 



28=S0UN0 8*80* 10*8: NEXT ft 

©OTO 720 

150: SOUND 0,66#£*8:NEXT S 

RETURN 



TINE DELrtVS ETC. * 
TO D=NEKT fi: RETURN 

715 D=150:GOTO 7 16 

720 D=200:£GTO 716 

73b 0=1000: GOTO 710 

74C D=5@0:60TQ 716 

750 FOR H=l TO 

: SOUND 6*0*0*0 

?6fci huP. S^l TO 

• SOUND 0*8*8*3 

800 Rtri ttt CODE IS OUESSED 

810 FOR C=l TO 16 

s£a SET COLOR 1,0*12:S0UND 6,65*19,8 

830 FOR D=i TO 25: NEXT D 

840 SETCOLOR li8f @s SOUND 8*0*0*0 

858 FOR fl=l TO 5s NEXT R: NEXT C: RETURN 

900 REt'l *** OUT OF 6UESSES! %** 

910 60SL*B 703 

920 POSITION 2*6:?' *6#6* 

930 GET #i,J 

^50 RErl fcfcfc 

90S FOR H=3 TO 

"Sb j- J: 

365 POSITION 9*0 



23 STEP 28 POSITION 2*A:? 
IJ :NEXT 8 

#bi " 

FOR SC=L \0 NP:S$=£KS€&7-S*SC£7) 

975 FOR H=l TO LENC3*>MF RStX $$< A > X >32 

THEN PT$=S*<H*7>:O0T0 980 

97? NEXT fl 

900 POSIT ION SvSC-l : ? #8 jkT*: POSITION IS 

» sc~*i * f #b j s^, sc ) 

bit- NEXT SC 

990 GOSUG 738* POKE 704*255: GOTO 368 



CARTOONS by 

Alan Oliver 



Line Lister 



How many t lines have you checked and re- 
checked that magazine listing you have 
just typed in only to find that you go 
cross-eyed looking at a whole screen of 
data or wear your fingers out typing 
..LIST 10. .LIST 20,. etc' Well here's a 
handy little Utility which won't find 
your bug but will make it a lot easier to 
read the screen. 

32500 POKE 764,255:LINE=0 

32510 IF PEEK (764) <> 255 THEN 

LIST LINE: LINE=LINE+1:G0T0 32530 

32520 GOTO 32510 

32530 IF PEEK (764) =28 THEN INPUT 

LINCR: LINE=LINCR-1 

32540 POKE 764, 255: GOTO 32510 

Type it in, save it by using LIST "C;" 
and then merge it with your newly typed 
program by using ENTER "C:", Type (in 
direct mode) GOTO 32500 and then keep 
hitting any key and watch the lines 
scroll up the screen. If your program 
starts at a high line number or jumps to 
a much higher line number press ESC and 
type in the first, or next line number. 

If you want to change a line in the 
program, press BREAK and use the editing 
facility to amend the line. Type CONT to 
continue . 




Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



8 



Adventure .... America 

Jeff Woodward 



Several years ago, three programmers in 
America developed the first Adventure 
type game on an American Government IBM 
Computer* Two of these guys were Willie 
Crothers and Don Woods. This Adventure 
was the Colossal Cave which soon spread 
(like wildfire!) to almost every large 
computer system in the world, Everyone 
was playing it. Then along came micro- 
computers and several people started 
developing Adventures for them. Perhaps 
the roost famous is Scott Adams of 
Adventure International. 



Creative Computing Software, 
P.O.Box 789-M, 
Morristown, M.J. 07950 
U.S.A. 



You can expect to pay shipping costs of 
about $5 on these prices. If you send an 
International Money Order or quote your 
VTSA or MASTERCARD (ACCESS) number this 
will be taken care of. 



Good luck on your Adventuring. 



The original Colossal Cave Adventure 
was soon put on the TRS-80, Apple etc. 
but never made it to the Atari. Recently 
a programmer in the States - Robert A. 
Howell - has just fitted the original 
Adventure into a 32K tape or a 4 OK disk 
for Atari. He says it was a lot of work 
'shoe-horning' it into 32K but it was 
worth it as now any Atari owner with 32K 
memory (no disk needed ! ) can play the 
classic Original Adventure. 



It contains almost everything the large 
computer original has - the Pirate, 
Dwarves, Snake, Clam, Dragon, Bear, 
Troll, Breathtaking View, all 15 
Treasures, all of the original rooms - 
including both mazesl. . .etc, etc! It even 
allows you to save your position in the 
cave and then restore it at a later time 
so you may continue where you have left 
off without having to start all over 
again . 

At the moment I do not know if the 
program is available in this country but 
I do know that it can be bought by Mail 
Order through Creative Computing Magazine 
- it is called ORIGINAL ADVENTURE. 
There are two versions available :- 

DISK - CS-7504 (40K) $24.95 
CASS - CS-7009 (32K) $19.95 

Creative Computing's address is;- 



Letters to America 

When I first brought my Atari 400, now 16 
months ago, there was very little in 
terms of books and software available so 
I set about to find some! I found a few 
User Club addresses from the back of The 
Atari Connection magazine (which is 
supposed to be available from Atari') and 
wrote off with fingers crossed. The 
response I have had from our American 
friends is, to say the least, nothing 
short of fantastic. There seems to be 
nothing that is too much trouble for them 
and without exception all have offered to 
send me programs. I have also written to 
the American magazines - Compute! , 
Analog, Mace etc, and again have always 
received replies and offers of help on 
any subject. 



I think any Atari enthusiast in this 
country taking the time to sit and write 
off to American Atari Users will be 
pleasantly surprised at the reaction. 

Start writing NOW! 



SUBSCRIBE 



to PAGE 6 

see page three for details 






Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



VULTURES m 



!6K 



Stan Ockers 



We are proud to bring you another 
fine program from the prolific keyboard 
of Stan Ockers. This program first 
appeared in ACE Newsletter published by 
Atari Computer Enthusiasts of Eugene 
Oregon and our thanks go to them and Stan 
Ockers for allowing us to use it. 

The display list has been amended so 
that most of the screen is in Antic Mode 
4, a mode which does not seem to have 
been explored much here in Britian. The 
character set is however standard. The 
sound routines have been put in the VBI 
so that Basic can get on with the program 
without having to cope with the update of 
sound registers. It runs much faster 
this way* 



y Pet. fe I -Hf^-^Tyr^^r.^.^ $.&$* ,V. iV>>T- rfmtf* rf. .fl. .-j".^'. .|. S?. ."J.. ^ ,y, 

i REi'1 * t 

2 REil * UULTUftES III t 

3 fit j- I # by t 

4 REPI 3 STAN OCKERS # 

5 Rtfl :?- FIRST PUBLISHED IN £ 



6 REfl t ACE NEWSLETTER * 

•- RBI t EUGENE * 

8 REfl * OREGON * 

9 h£V\ -fc * 

le reh ^muzt^mn$vu%**t* 

86 GRAPHICS 18; POSITION 5,3:? #6;"vultur 

es»s POSITION S*5: ? *Gi u 111" 

1 m PftB I = 1 547 : 1 mfiGE8= 1 552 : If'lAGE 1 =1553 : in 

«3E2= 1 554: 1 nA6£3= 1 555 : HPOS3= 1 559 : 0P0S3- 1 

567 

i 1 9 FLhGO= I 568 : FLAG 1 = 1 563 : FLA62=1570 

1 1 2 COL0=52 : COL 1 =24 : C0L2=32 : COL3=£44! BKC 

0L=144 

1 20 UP0S0= 15b4 : UPOS 1 = 1 585 : UP0S2= 1566 ; If?G 
PT-I584 

i 30 rtPOS0= l ^56 : HPOS 1 = 1 5S7 : HP0S2" 1 558 '- RAP1 

TOP=106: PPBASE=54279: S0P1CTL=559: GRftCTL=5 

3277 

L 40 PCOLR8=704 1 PCOLfi 1 =785 : PeuLR2=706 : PCO 

LR3=7@7 : POKE i 5 77 , i y 

1 5 j 1 r'l 8$\ 20 > * BB*( 20 > *U$< 2 > : U*< 1 J=CHR-.fc< 

1 36 >: U*< 2 J'=CHR*< 138 >-"BB*< 1 >=CHR:i* 8 >: B6*< 

20 >=CHR*< 9 ) : BS*< 2 >=8B$ 

151 DIH CL*<38>sCL*0>=" ,l 5CL*<38>=" ":C 
L$»i 2 >=CL$ 

L52 DIH X*<38>*XlS<38>sX*0>= J1 X ,, :X#<38>= 

" X " ' X*C 2 >=X* : X 1 *C 1 >= n x (J : X 1 f < 38 >= n x " ' X 1 $< 



153 Did LTNS*C 46 >: RESTORE 15+iFOR 1=1 TO 
46: READ ft: LTN8$< I # I >=CHR*C A >s NEXT I 

154 DATA 124,23*41*29*38*124*23*30*30*40 
,29*30*38*40*29*38* 124*29*40*23* 124*29*4 

1,^*41*29*4 1, 29*40*124*29 

155 DATA 30,30,41 ,29, 30*30*41* 29*30*30,4 
i ,24,30*30* i24 

156 Dli'l ERfiS*t 46): RESTORE 157: FOR 1=1 TO 
46 : REflD A : ERAS*t I * I )=CHR*£ fl > : NEXT I 

L5 DATA 32,29*32*29*30*32*29,30,30,32*2 

9,30,30^32*29*30,32,23,32,29,32*29*32*29 

* 3i * 23 , 32*29 * 30 * 32*29 

158 DATA 30,30*32*29,30,30,32,2-9,38,30*3 

2 **^i ^i^t 7 32 

I F; - COUN r=2W : PERCh= 1 S@ ; B IRDS=e : IF=3 J POK 

E 1555,8 

2tjk. bOSUd 6000:GOSUG ZaQ^iPOKE 764*255: ? 

CHRf<2S>j H PRESS START TO BEGIN 1 ':? "ANY 
KEY TO PAUSE' 1 

202 ? "Bettf-are the- -golden vultures!! !"s60 
SUB 1000 
21b A*P EEKt R AilTuP )- 16 : KUKt Pf'lBA^E , H ; Pu KE 

Pm I * A : SOUND a , 8 , , 8 : AHJSRC 1 536 > : 6RAPH I 
CS a'SOSUB 5tj80 
220 POKE SDPICTL* 62 :POKE GRACTL*3:P0KE 76 

; t,t, ■_"■_> 

230 COuN i =20 s PERCN= 180 : B IPUS=0 : Q IF=3 : POK: 
£ 1 555 * 8 : GuLD=5(te = SUURE=@ 
25S SHiELD=2@:f0f: J-iHlELO TO 23:POSITIO 
N I * J : ? X*i : NEXT J : POSIT I ON a , ; ? " d i f 

'iC ■: .i •"■* hi 91^" 

260 POKE PCOLfiO *243 : POKE PCOLR 1*243: POKE 
PC OL R2 * 243 : POKE PCO LR3 , 40 

27fc POKE 752*l:fOR 1=2 TO 36 STEP 2:P0SI 

TION I* is? U*:NEXT I:eLEFT=lS:BLHND=0:PCi 

KE i5i"ti*0iHIT=8 

275 POSITION l,SHIELD-i:? CL$ 

2 1 " POS I T ION 22_, y : ? OIF: POS IT I OH 26 *8 : ? 

SCORE : POS 1 1 1 ON 34 * : ? HIGH 

283 RESTORE 2S5JF0R 1=1564 TO 157i:REACt 

fi : POKE I * H = NEXT I : POKE 1 55a , 1 O0: POKE 1 78 

3, 1 L 

2S5 Dm FA S*0*0*lb8*0*0*0*8 

290 B$=8B$ 

293 POt±- r- = 12*6KC0L:P0KE 1574,0s POKE 708,. 

COL08POKE 789 * COL 1: POKE 710*CGL2:POK£ 71 

L*C0L3 

308 C0UNT^COUNT-t5i*=P£EKO575>:IF HIKfl 
THE N _H I T- A ■ i_ POKE 1 788 * 1 29 i SCORE=SCORE+ 1 6* 
U IF: POSITION 2b, y; T SCORE 

310 IF PEEK\ FLAGO )=@ SNO COUNTO THEN GO 
S03 905 : POKE ^FLA60>* IsPOKE CHP0S8>#48+R 
t3> POKE UPOS0,4S 

._: if PE£K< FLPlfitf >=1 i"N£N POKE ypOS0,PEE 

K<vPOS0>+OIF 

:-. IF PEEK< UPOS0 »=*P£RCH THEN POKE FLAO 

0, 6: fi= I NT< < PE£K< HPOSO >-4S *v4 > : GOSUB 950 : 

PO 2 HPOS0*0 SPOKE yPOS0*32 

340 IF PEEK< FLflOl >=0 AND COUNKO THEN GO 
SO.. S03SPOKE '>LAGi ji*UPOKt <HPOSL )*4$+fE 
-POKE UP0Sl#4S 

3d*3 IF PEE!vLFLH&i>?=i, friEN POKE UP0S1,PEE 

K<<JPuSl >+OIF 

46* IF PE£^UPOSt>>=PtRCH THEN POKE FLAG 

1 * ti i A= I NT< C PEEK< HPOS 1 >-4S V4 > : GOSUB 950 : 

HOKc HPOS 1*0: POKE UPOS 1*32 

over... 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



10 



376 IF FEEKX FLflS2 >=0 HNO COUNT < THEN GO 

Sue 305 ; POKE i FLfib2 >* 1 : POKE < HPQ32 > ,40+R 

*8 : mjKE UP0S2 j 48 

380 IF PEEKXFLfi62>=i THEN POKE UP032*PEE 

k<UP0S2)+GIF 

330 IF PEEK',UPuS2>y=PtKCH THEN POKE FLfib 

2, fl : fi= I NT< t. PEEKt HP0S2 >-48 V4 > : 6GSUB 350 : 

PGrE HPGS2,0:PGKE Ur032,32 

391 IF BLftN0>2 THEN 50O 

3S^ IF SLEKK1 THEH 600 

406 FLfiSH=FLflSH-i:IF FLtfSH<0 THEN SOTO 5 

50 

48 _ IF PtEK«, 1574 >>0 FmEN GOTO 650 

41m GGlD=GGLD-1:IF GQLD<0 AND BLflN0>3 TH 
Eh iju^Lj=iee*<3-DIF^iOIF=DIh+2:XCNT=3e:PO 

KE 704,44: POKE 705,44: POKE 706,44 

420 IF KCNT>0 THEN X€NT=>&NT-i: IF XCNT=0 
THEN DIF=DIF~2:P0KE 704,243: POKE 705,24 
3:fOKE 706,243; PuSITLGN 22,0:? DIF 
425 IF PEEKX 764X255 THEN GOSUB 1000 
430 GOTO 300 

430 REN U- REF1QUE fi SHIELD t% 
580 POKE 1789,287: SUG0L=C0Ll5 FOR 1=1 TO 
6 1 POKE 70S,PEEKt 706 >+2: POSITION 1 ,SHIELD 
:? Xl£;FuR J=i TO 5: NEXT J 
50^ POSITION l,SHIEL_Di? X$:FOR J-l TO 5: 
NEXT J • NEXT I: POSIT ION 1,SHIELD-1:? CLs: 
POSITION 1 , SHIELD:? Oi_$ 

508 SHI ELD=6H I ELD+ 1 : PERCH=PERCH+8 : I F SH I 
EUj-23 THEN 706 

510 UIF=UIF-1HF 0IF<2 THEN DIF=2 
529 GOTO 270 

556 POKE i 'S3* 17 U POKE 712,40: X=ftND< y X£2 
3+8: POSITION X,2: ? LTNG*,-:PGKE 712,1 5: PO 



iii.UN *,£:y LKfiS$,:POKE 712,BKC0L 
555 fi=3-BI F : FLHSH=fiNEK Xfc3@*fi+ 1 0£fi 

500 GOTO 405 

530 REF1 *% REPlfllNING BIROS LEfiUE t-t 

DIF=OIF+i:IF DIF>6 THEN DIF=6 

FOR 1=1 TO 150 

P=PEEK>:uPOS0^:IF 



bOM 



P>0 THEN POKE MPOSO 

P>0 THEN POKE UP0S1 



F-PEEi^OFOSl )i IF 

P=PE£K<UP0S2):IF P>0 THEN POKE MP032 



,P-1 

,p-i 

6l6 

,P-l 

62t, NiLXT I : POKE 77, 0i GOTO 270 

64S RBI ** HIT BV LIGHTNING ** 

85b POKE BPQS3,0:POKE 53273,0: POKE 1733, 

1 83 i POKE 70l ,BKCOL 

BS iOR 1=0 TO 40 SiEP 4: POKE 712, I: FOR 

J=i TO 30: NEXT J=NEXT I: PUKE 712,EKC0L 

B6u FOR 1=1 TO 200: NEXT I: POKE 1738,73: F 

OR J=i TO DIF 

36-: OOJFE-SOQRE-lOOaF SCORE<0 THEN SCOR 

£=h 

670 PUS IT ION 26.0 s? SCORE," j 'iFOR L-l 

TO 100: NEXT LsNEXT J 

BSO POKE 707, 40: SOTO 270 

70O IF SCORE>HIGH THEN HIGH=SCOR£ 

;05 POKE GRfiCTL.yiFOR 1=53261 TO 53284: P 

OKE i,0ifiEX7 I 

710 uRfiPHlCb L8s POSIT ION 5,3:? #6, "final 

72. POSITION 3,5; V #6, SCORE 

73^ POSITION 5,8:? #6* "PRESS STfiRT":PGSI 

TICN 4,3= > #G>"TO kLhV fibfilN" 



^0 



740 IF PEEK< 53273 )OG_THEN 740 

75^_ GRAPHICS 0:8OSUS 300w:6OTO 

300 REfl Zt STfiRT MOTHER BIRD £* 

S0j OOUNT=lNF<RND<0}£30> 

310 R=lNKRNDX0>$18>+2: IF HSOX BSX R > »0 T 

HEr* 310 

320 E£C R *R >^LriR*< 1 > i POS IT I ON 2$< R-l > * 1 : ? 

" u : BLEFT=BLEFT-1 : RETURN 
S4>j REV] U. 6IRD HI bHIELD ** 

95k POSITION R, C PERCH -32 >/«!? U*; J POKE 1 

7SS f 150: SLfiNO=BLflND+ 1 '• RETURN 

9SS REfl t* PflUSE ROUTINE t% 

1000 POKE 704,255 

1010 IF P£EK< 53273 X>6 THEN 1010 

L02O REIiJRN 

13S3 REfl t% UB£ ROUTINE Zt 

2Oti0 RESTORE 2001 :Din UB*<348):F0R 1=1 T 

548 : READ H : UEfcK I , I >=CHR$< ft > : NEXT I 



2S^1 DRTh 72,I3S 



mj r £. i 



152 



t • 



2UW OHiH 206,48,8, 173,40,6, 16,2y-173,4t 

/6, 141 ,40,£, 162,Zj^54, 16,6,254, 16,b, l^S, 

L6,6,20i ,d, 144,5, 163*0, 157 ,lb,b 

2S04 DATA 202,16,235 

20Oo DhTH 174^120,2,224,11,206,3,142,247 

,6,224,7,208,3* 142,247,0 

2000 GhTh i 74 j 24 7,b, if 3, 23, 6, 20 1,200, 176 

,16, 224 , 7 , 2S*d , 6, 23b , 2 i , 6, 236 , 23 , G , 201 ,4b 

, I "i-4 , 1 1! , ^24 , 1 i ,20b ,b 

2008 OhIh 206,23,6,206*23*6 

20xO DHTft 24,173,11,6,105,4,133,204,162, 

0, 134,207, 160,0,132,203, 1S3,20,6, 157,0,2 

iJS, 180, 12,6,221, 16,6,203,0, 133,23 

2020 UfiTfi 6,221,24,6,240,63,189*16,8,157 

, 12^ 6, 100,20,0, 157,24,8, 165,293,221 ,28,6 

, 240 , I 0, 1 69 , , 1 45 , 203,230 , 203 , 240 

2030 uhTh 42,203,23^,133, 16,6,170, 133,48 

,6* ^ 33, 205,189, 43, 6, 133,206, 177,205,240, 

14 , * 45 j 203 , 230 , 20b , 20b *z 

£0^ D+TTH 230, 206, 230 , 203, 240 ,10, 208, 238 

,1G3,0, 145,203,230,203,208,250,230,204,1 

66,207,232, 134,267, 224,4* 144, 154 

2042 UfiTfi 173,15,208,240,34,106,144,2*16 

2,0,186, 144, 2, 162, 1,106, 144,2, 162, >:, 169, 

0,1 5 T tf Zb ,6 , 1 57 ,32, b 

20^-t DfiTfi 141,30*206,238,33,6,169,2,141, 

132,6 

2U4c OHTfi 173,7,208,240,3,141,33,6 

2m50 DfiTfi 174,252,6,240,36,206,243,6, 16, 

JL- 1 03 ^0,0, 141,0, 210, 2.i2, 189,0,6, 141, 1,2 

10 

20 ji ufiifi 232,139,0*6,240,9,141,248,6,23 

2, 142,252,6,206,3, 141 ,252,6 

2004 DfiTfi i74, 253*6 ,240*36,206, 243 ,6, 16, 

31 ,133,0,6, 141 ,2,210,232, 183,0,6, 141,3,2 

10 

20i& DfiTfi 232, 189,0,6,240*3, 141 #243,6,23 

2,142,253,6,208,3,141,253,6 

20S0 DnTfi 104,168,104,170,104,76,38,223 

2000 60SUB 3010:GGSUB 4 100: RETURN 

3000 REfl * PftSE - INSERT UBI RATINE % 

3mi0 RESTORE 3020: FOR 1=1536 TO 1545: REfl 

h*POKE I,fi;NtXT I 

"i02»j DfiTfi 104,160,0,162,0,163*7*76,92,^2 

8 

3030 ft=fiOfi< 06* > : 6= 1 N i\ fi-^256 > : C=fi-256*:B : P 

OKI 1 538, C* POKE i 540,8: RETURN 

...GOTO 13 



i 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



11 



More Graphics Modes . . . 

Colin Boswell 



I 
1 



J 



Graham Daubney of Atari recently 
mentioned at a BUG meeting that he had 
discovered, quite accidently, some 
totally new Graphics modes. Intrigued by 
this, I went home and started messing 
around myself. 



After much peeking and pokeing, I think 
I may have some answers* The register of 
interest is the graphics priority 
register at 53275 which is shadowed at 
gprior, 623 decimal. This is used in 
setting the priority for Player 
Missiles and the like. But the important 
part is that the GTIA chip uses the 2 
most significant bits - 6 and 7 - to 
determine how it is to output the 
information. 



Using some inspired guesswork, this is 
what I think may be happening. When GTIA 
gets a byte of Data, it first looks at 
the Priority register. If the 2 most 
significant bits are not set, then it 
outputs the data as normal for the mode 
in question i.e BASIC modes 0-8, But if 
either of the 2 bits are set then it 
splits the byte into 2 4-bit nibbles, 
which gives it 2 numbers between 1 and 
16. It then outputs 2 pixels as shown in 
figure 1. 



5 eRRPHiC::. 
10 u PR 103=623" 

20 OPEN #2,4„0 J "K; ,i 

36 FOR X=l )u 38 i FOR V=i TO 22 

49 POSITION X,Ys? "X' b 

50 n£XT Y:NEXT X 

60 FOR X=13 TO 26: FOR y=8 TO 16 

78 POSIi iOH X*V :? "0" 

SO NEXT V:NEXT X 

90 FOR Blf*8 TO t$tt STEP 64 

10& POKE GPRIOR ,BIT 

lit) iiET #2,H 

120 NEXT' BIT 

L3i GOTO 90 



Priority 
Register 
Bit 







Figure 1 



Output color 4 at a 
luminesence given by (n) 

Output the color stored in 
color register (n) which 
can be any color register 
or the Player-Missile 
color registers 

Output the color whose 
number is (n) and whose 
luminesence is stored in 
color register 4 



This is essentially what happens in 
Graphics modes 9-11. The operating 
system simply creates a Graphics 8 
display list and then sets the bit in 
PRIOR. But what nobody seems to have 
thought of before is that this can be 
done for any mode, not just GR.8 



The only mode I've tried it in so far 
is GR.O, but believe me - it's quite 
amazing I What happens is that instead of 
each character producing a letter, it 
produces two pixels in colour. 
Potentially this means that all the 
programs you had to produce in GR. 2 to 
get colour can now be expanded to a full 
40 x 25 display in up to 16 colours 
giving a resolution equal to GR. 9-11. 



I've included a quick demo in listing 
1, which puts up a simple display and 
steps through the different priority 
settings. Somebody out there can do 
better than this. ■ All I have done is 
some ground work, so get out your Atari 
and start writing some programs I Try some 
of the other Graphics modes too, I have 
only tried GR.O, 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



12 



WHATS NEW? 

Geoff Brown 



I've been asked to write a regular 
column for PAGE 6 outlining some of the 
new products which are imminent and 
others which are as yet only on the 
horizon* As you are aware, the ATARI has 
an enormous number of games , utilities 
etc- available and these are increasing 
at a phenomenal rate. Hardly a week goes 
by without a new company launching a new 
product. Some of the new items are 
discarded as not being up to the required 
standard and others are considered to be 
unsuitable for the British market or too 
expensive etc. 



So what's likely to be available in the 
near future? Let's begin by looking at 
some of the new games, SNOOPER TROOPS 1 
is a children to adult adventure with 
full graphics and animation. It uses the 
whole 48K Disk to its limit and is well 
presented in a beautiful binder with 
comprehensive program notes. You have to 
find the Granite Ghost by touring around 
the town in the 'SNOQPMOBILE' taking 
1 SECQPSHQTS ' with your camera. You then 
collate all the information and have to 
solve the mystery. Fantastic fun for all 
the family. WAYOUT finds you trapped in 
a 3-D Maze! You can run up and down 
corridors until you get vertigo. So 
realistic, you really feel you are there. 
Chased by animals who hunt in the Maze - 
a most realistic simulation. Plenty of 
action, sound and graphics, it comes on 
32K disk. PLATTERMANIA is a new ROM 
cartridge which puts you in charge of a 
lot of spinning plates on the end of 
sticks. You have to keep them all 
spinning or there are disasterous 
results , 



If you've seen Micro-Painter, you ain't 
seen nothing yet! PAINT I is the ultimate 
painting utility. You can change the 
width of the brush, the speed , the shape, 
the colour. You can even paint with 
multi-coloured paint and change to 
tartans, checks, stripes etc. Zoom in on 



two magnifications and paint on pre-drawn 
pictures. This comes with a magnificent 
book on history of art, computer art, 
modern art and programming notes. Now 
the bad news - its on 48K disk but a 16K 
cassette is rumoured for the New Year, 



Back to games, BEACHES OF NORMANDY is a 
new war game on cassette and disk (32K) . 
It features scrolling screen and the full 
scenario of the Normandy landing. If you 
liked Eastern front you'll love this* 
ESCAPE FROM TRAAM and CURSE OF CRAWLEY 
MANOR are just what you 16K cassette 
owners have been waiting for - two new 
adventures in 16 K! You can now join the 
Adventure lovers and solve these two 
intriguing mysteries from Adventure 
International. An excellent introduction 
to adventuring. 



On the Utilities side is DISKEY - a 
utility to 'unlock' your disks. You can 
examine, change or search any disk you 
want. It will copy, boot and change 
files to your specification. I use it 
all the time to keep my disk library in 
order and look at new programs. It 
requires 32K. FASTCHIP will speed up 
your Basic programs! This chip is easily 
installed and replaces the floating point 
chip in the O.S. and remains completely 
compatible with the Atari O.S, It speeds 
up the floating point routines by 3.5 
times and indirectly speeds up your Basic 
too. This will be available before 
Christmas. PERCOM DISK DRIVES are now 
available at only £375. These are the 
latest single density drives and are 
COMPLETELY reliable. There is also a 
switchable Double Density/ Single Density 
Drive at £475 for those who want this 
extra facility. Finally, slightly 
cheaper!, are WICO COMMAND CONTROL 
joysticks guaranteed for one year . Once 
tried, you will never be able to go back 
to your plastic poles! They really aire 
much better. 

cont . 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



13 



I've probably ruined your bank balance 
already, so I'll stop here bat will just 
mention that there will be another 20 
titles available before Christmas! 

I'll try and keep up a regular column 
so write in and tell me what you want to 
read about. I am off to LAS VEGAS in 
January so there should be lots of 
exciting things to tell you about. Until 
then, keep racking up those bonus points 1 



SOUN DS INTERESTING, . . 

5 htfl k* phase shift #$ 

6 R£H 

10 Fuk j-138 P0 200 

20 SOUND 0,J, 10,10 

3u SOUND l»j+i#L0jiO 

40 SOUND 2,0+2,10,18 

60 SOUND 3,0+3*10,10 

65 IF PEEK<764X>255 THEN FOR I = 10 TO PF_ 

EKt 764): SOUND 3, I , 10, 14:NE; : <T I: POKE 764, 

Til NEXT JJbOrO 5 

80 REM 

80 REPl fc* FRY H ITT INb ftNV KEV 

Si REH $* TRY NJTH SHIFT OR CTRL m 



VULTURES cont. 

40i3 3EF1 £* SOUNDS *S 

4i0>r. RESTORE 4128s FUR 1=1665 TO 1766:REfl 

D ft. POKE L*nirEXl L 

■hL_ti uhIh b>3, 170,3,54,170,3,4y, 170,3,45, 
l7to#3,40,i 70*3*36,1 f""0,3,0,0,O 

4i-_.2 jnTk i 0, 204, -i,Li,204, 3, 10, 204,3,3#2 

04 j 3* S j 204 j 3 j ? , 204 * 3 j 6 ■ & , 

41*t£ uHTtf 2O,i43*i,iu,143,3,30,i4S,8*35, 
l3f ,20, 1 00, l 34*3*3, £, 0, 

4i'-4 OtftH i"i,I2*20,i6, 143*30,12,3,40*10, 
132*60,23,13*}, 70*0*0*0 

4i-6 UHTh 40, 1 74, id«,5tf* 172,20,60, 170, 20, 
70 , 1 0* , 20 , 80 , 1 66#£© * 00 * 1 04 , 20 , 1 h5 , 1 62 , 20 

,0*8,0 

4210 01 ft U0$C 4 >: RESTORE 4220 s FOR 1 = 1 TO 
4 : *EhD h : ^0$( I )=CHh$< & > : NEXT I 

42 1 5 Uu=HDR< MO* >: POKE I PI6PT+ 1 , 1 NT< UO/256 
j: PuKE IHGk r *U0-2S6#PE£K< IH6PT+1 > 
4220 ufflfl 36, HO, i 53,0 

423^ 2 IH 01-*<5>sRESruR£ 4240: FOR 1=1 TO 
5 : READ fl i U 1 *f I )=CHR$< h ) - NEXT I 

423 o ^i=ftOR<UU>:pG£t mSPT+3#lNKUl/'256 

> : POKE I NGPT+2 , U 1 -£56#PEEK< I P1GPT+3 > 
4240 JflTh 66,165,24*24*0 

4250 DIP] U2*< 5 >s RESTORE 4260s FOR 1=1 TO 

5 s ■ .EflP H : 2*< £ >=CHfi£ >-. a j : NEXT I 

4255 U2=flDR'; 02* >: POKE I HSPT+5 , 1 NT< U2. 256 
>lru£E IH0Pr+4,U2-256^PEEK< IIT6PT+5> 
42bu DATA 135,36,24#24j0 
42V Din U3*k &;>: RESTORE 4230 : FOR 1=1 TO 

6 ^ KaHU H s U3*< 1 >=CHR*':. h > : NEXT I 



taHhiJEifiigiriHmiMBacn 




SHERWOODS (PHOTO) LTD 

11/13 Great Western Arcade 
Birmingham 2 



we guarantee the 

BEST PRICES 
in town on all ATARI product 

e.g. DISK DRIVE £279.90 

(inc. VAX) 









32K &48K RAMS PLUS 
REPLACEMENT KEYBOARD FOR 400 

FULL RANGE OF INDEPENDENT 
SOFTWARE 

Telephone 021-236 7211 



4i73 U5=ftDR<U3$>:PQKfc 1F16PT+7* INK 03^256 
> : t OKE I PiGPT +6 , U3-256^PEEK< I HOPT+7 ) 
4230 ufllft 123,66,36*24*24,0 
4200 Dili U4*< 6 >s RESTORE 4236; FOR 1=1 TO 
6 : ~ tnD ft : U4*< I >=CHR*< H > : NErsT I 
42:92 U4=ftDR* u4* >'. POKE inGPT+3, IHT< U4^256 
j i P0K£ I liftt- T+6 *U^-^;jb*PEEKC I H6KT+9 > 
42io DhTA 255, 255, 255, 25^, 255, 
43b« RETURN 

4999 ROI t* CHfiNiBE DISPLfiV LIST X* 
5080 DL=PEEK< 560 >+256*P£EK< 561 > 
5010 POKE OL+3#70sPOICE DL+6»6:F0R l=DL+7 

TU Di_+28:rOKE 1,4: NEXT U RETURN 
bOucj ORflPrilCS UiPOKE 752* Is POSITION 3,1: 

? Ji m Multures iij *t*^ 

601*) POSITION 5,3 iY "The vultures ^re La 
nd ; i-sg -a>'id " : ? "remov i n& protec t- 1 v*=- layers 



6020 ? "*-. 



LjOU ! 



There are three layer-s at>d 



";7 "eve-ry tintt x-hree vultures land":? 

: oi .* i Erjer w i i i d i ^appear . " : ? 

6830 7 iJ "t^u can stop the birds with": 
a removal device control led by":? "..io 
ystick 0. you get ten times" 

b040 "tne difficulty for each bird 'jou 
B :? "stop, Hhen you have retiioved a" 

BOu^i '. " fiockji the difficulty Will -30 up 
, ":? j? "Tf you get hit by lightning you 
r 

60b0 : - i-'-'jre nuill decrease by a hundred 
" : 7 " t i ffte s t he d i f f 1 c ul ty . " : ? : -? J1 just a 

; = -- . , . " 

6OS0 RtTUKM 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



14 



Atari Attracts 

Phil Griffin 



One of the many excellent features 
included in the ATARI Computers is the 
automatic screen protection systems 
called the "ATTRACT MODE". This system 
initiates a continuous rotation of 
colours on the screen as protection 
against "burn through" which may occur 
when a colour is displayed for too long 
without change. The computer monitors 
the use of the keyboard and will 
automatically enter the "ATTRACT MODE" if 
no keys have been depressed in the 
previous 9 minutes (9.01 to be precise). 
As soon as the keyboard is used, the 
"ATTRACT MODE" is disabled and the 
original screen colours return 



You may have found that some games, 
which use only paddles or joysticks, 
enter into the "ATTRACT MODE" 
automatically after 9 minutes use, With 
a little bit of "peeking 1 ' and "pokeing" 
you can discover what causes the "ATTRACT 
MODE" to begin and, hopefully, how to 
temporarily disable it while you play 
your game. 



The first thing you need to know is 
that the memory location which governs 
whether the "attract mode" will be 
activated or not is location 77. By 
"peeking" into this location, you can see 
what is happening during the 9 minutes 
before the system comes into operation* 
The following short program should do the 
trick. 



10 PRINT PEEK (77): GOTO 10 



This program forms an endless loop which 
will repeatedly print the contents of 
location 77. On running, you will see 
that the contents of this location 
gradually increase in steps of 1 from 0. 
If you sat and watched for long enough, 
you would eventually see something 



strange happen to the sequence of 

numbers. To speed things up a little you 

can add an extra line to the program and 
run it again to watch the results. 

5 POKE 77, 125 

This line inserts a value of 125 into 
location 77 and on running you will see 
that the values displayed start at 125 
and not as previously. This value will 
gradually increase until 127 is 
displayed. The next number shown will be 
254 and at this point the "ATTRACT MODE" 
will be activated. 



You can see from this that if location 
77 contains a value of 127 or less, then 
the "ATTRACT MODE" will remain 
inoperative. The ideal situation from a 
game - playing point of view would be to 
place a in this location as often as 
possible or at least every 9 minutes. 
This can be done by including an 
instruction POKE 77, in a frequently 
used part of the program (e.g a 
"movement" or "fire" routine). This will 
ensure that the attract mode remains 
inoperative during the course of the 
game. 



As a matter of interest, this is 
precisely what happens when a key is 
depressed. If you run the program again 
and then press a key you will see that 
the value shown will immediately change 
to and gradually increase as before. 
Any subsequent pressing of keys will have 
the same effect. 



If you want to use the "ATTRACT MODE" 
during one of your own programs this is 
easily done by issuing the instruction 
POKE 77,254. The system can then be 
disabled at the appropriate point by a 
POKE 77, instruction. 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



15 



Software 



DE-LUXE INVADERS 






ROKLAN 



l/2 PLAYERS 



16KDISK £2195 



16K ROM £28.99 



Vte all know about Space Invaders so 
what's new about De-Luxe Invaders? Well, 
not much really. There are one or two 
nice touches, which don't add much to the 
game but do improve the visual 
presentation. Once you've seen them a 
few times however, it's back to shoot 
them Invaders again, Whether it is more 
difficult than ordinary Invaders, I 
don't know-^depends how good you are at 
saving the galaxy. If you buy this as 
your first Invaders you won't be 
disappointed but if you are hoping to 
move on to something better following 
ordinary Space Invaders, think carefully 
- it is not vastly different. The sound 
by the way is not what it could be and 
the opening sequences are agonisingly 
slow. 

The concept of Space Invaders is great 
but you can't really improve it much. 
The Atari VCS version is probably as good 
as any. 



CLOWNS & BALLOONS 

DATASOFT 

1/2 PLAYERS 



16K CASS/DISK 
£21.80 



When I first loaded the program, I 
spent at least five minutes just watching 
the sample game, admiring the graphics 
and sound. 

The game consists of catching a clown 
who jumps from the side of the big top on 
to a trampoline and then bouncing him up 
and down to burst the balloons at the 
top. Make sure you catch him on the way 
down! A monkey watches the proceedings 
impassively from a high wire. 



Playing required a lot of per serve ranee 
to get used to the speed of movement of 
the joystick. In fact I was beginning to 
get bored before I got good enough to 
burst the first set of balloons but clear 
them I did to be rewarded by more fancy 
graphics and nearly a nasty surprise! I 
wonder what happens when you clear the 
second set? 

My young children (5 and 7) have mixed 
feelings about this game. They like to 
watch others play but find the joystick 
usage too difficult. 

In conclusion - not a game I could get 
addicted to but the absolutely superb 
graphics make it well worth buying to 
impress family and friends with the Atari 
capabilities. 



BAJA BUGGIES 

GAMESTAR 
I PLAYER 



16K CASS/DISK 
£19.95 



Drive across the California desert 
under a blazing sun. You are right at 
the back of the grid with eighty buggies 
ahead of you ! Put your foot on the 
floor and get past them buggies - watch 
you don't hit them too much though or go 
off the road there are no breakdown 
trucks out here. 

The concept of a driving game is not 
new but what makes Baja Buggies special 
is the unique 3-D perspective as you 
drive towards the distant mountains. 
When you turn a corner, you really do 
turn-the mountains and sky scroll across 
and you feel as if you are really in the 
car. The game is for one player only and 
has a choice of three courses with two 
skill levels. It is well worth the 
money-after all where in England can you 
race across the desert under the blazing 
sun! 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



16 



Software 



CHOPLIFTER 



FROGGER 



BRODER&RUND 



I PLAYER 



48K DISK ON-LINE SYSTEMS 



£25,50 



I PLAYER 



16K CASS. 
32K DISK 

£23.95 



I first saw Choplifter on the Atari 
stand at the Personal Computer World show 
where Atari were using it to show off the 
machine's capabilities. "The biggest 
crowd was watching this game and rightly 
so - it is superb. 

The idea is to fly your helicopter and 
rescue hostages whilst fighting off 
pursuing jet fighters and bombing tanks 
which are trying to kill you and the 
hostages. Once you find the building 
where the hostages are, you blast it open 
and they come tunning! Then it's land 
your chopper and get as many aboard as 
you can before the enemy attacks, some 
will get scared and run off if the enemy 
gets too close and many will die if you 
are not quick enough. Watch you don't 
kill your own people, it's easy to do if 
you don't watch where you fire. The 
simulation of the helicopter flight as 
your chopper dodges and weaves is quite 
surperb and the reaction of the hostages 
is most realistic. The whole display is 
in Graphics 8 and makes very effective 
use of scrolling and Atari's other 
unbeatable qualities. 

Shame it is only available on Disk, but 
if you have a Disk Drive, go out and buy 
this. Or, how about going out and buying 
a Disk Drive! 



All you arcade freaks, will have been 
waiting for Frogger to arrive and will 
need only a short review. It was worth 
the wait - go and buy it! 

For those of you who don't know what 
the fuss is about, get a look at this 
game which is simple in concept but 
fascinating to play. You have to get 
your frogs into the bank at the top of 
the screen to earn bonus points. Quite 
simple eh? Well, you've first got to 
cross a busy street then over a beach and 
across the river. If you don't get run 
over or drowned there are many other 
perils including alligators, otters and 
worms! And by the way there's a lady 
frog out there who needs your help. The 
game is quite challenging but not in the 
nerve - racking way of the space- 
challenge games, you can relax a little 
in this one. 

Preppie and Pacific Coast Highway are 
similar games but Frogger was the first 
and on the Atari is probably the best. 
Frogger uses sound much more sparingly 
than Preppie and its much the better for 
it. 



Banner b y Phil Griffin 



There have been several "Banner" 10 tiftflPHICS 2+ie:SETCQL0R 0#i2#8sH=50 

Programs published but this is probably 29 Dlii H¥<3&; 

the simplest and is equally as effective. 38 POSIT I UN 3#3i? #b* " =========== " 

The symbols in lines 30,40 & 50 are 48 POSITION 3,4*? #£;"= 

inverse video "equals" signs and the 5tf POSITION 3#5:? #6 i" ============= « 

speed can be altered by changing the *M*=". Cl ^ Sh " cs:i WELCOME TO hThRI til 

value of H in line 10. 7 ^ QR ^ TQ 2S:p0SITI0N 4 , 4:? #Gift$<D , 

D+li>:F0R 6=1 TO N=NEXT OcNEXT D=60T0 78 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



17 



First Steps 



First steps will be a column of hints 
and tips to help you get started with 
your Atari, it will not teach you how to 
write programs but will try and give 
answers to the many little problems you 
face when first beginning. Write in with 
the Problems you experienced when you 
first had your Atari ar*3 tell us how you 
solved them. 



Mike Reynolds -Jones writes 

One of the first things to do, and a 
good way to learn is to type in program 
listings from the magazines. Computer and 
Video Games, Personal Computing Today and 
Micro Computer Printout (as well as Page 
61 -Ed} are English Magazines that carry 
Atari listings whilst Compute! , Antic and 
Analog are the best American Magazines. 
(Drop Page 6 a line if you can't find 
these in your local shop) . This is how I 
started but I soon found that the 
information available was not very clear 
in certain areas, for exan£>le, lines too 
long to fit memory, clearing the screen, 
printing of graphics symbols, finding 
errors, all presented problems. 



It is well worth buying additional 
books to go with your manual. Several 
good publications are available but by 
far the best is 'Your Atari Conputer - a 
guide to ATARI 4O0/8OQ personal 
computers 1 by Lon Boole, Martin McNiff 
and Steven Cook. Published by Osborne 
McGraw - Hill at around £10. 00, this is 
the Atari 'Bible' and Contains everything 
you may need at every level of 
experience. There are 11 chapters and 
453 pages covering Basic , Advanced Basic, 
Disk Drives, Printers, Tape Recorder, 
Graphics, Sound etc., with a large 
Appendix covering PEEK and POKE, ERROR 
Messages, Codes, Characters and 
Key strokes. This book is invaluable - 
it will remain your constant reference 
guide. 



Firstly, when typing listings try POKE 
82, without entering a line number. 
This will set the left margin from its 
normal position of 2 to zero which will 
give you six extra spaces in each logical 
line. Most listings are printed this way 
so you will be able to see if your typing 
is correct as the screen display will 
line up exactly with the listing, if you 
press SYSTEM RESET at any time you will 
have to re-POKE. 

Printers cannot print graphic or control 
characters so check the write up 
accompanying the listing very carefully. 
In many listings you will see a bracket 
in inverted commas, n } n which represents 
the CLEAR SCREEN Command "V obtained by 
pressing the ESC Key, then CTRL and CLEAR 
together. The "bent arrow" should then 
appear. Check your Basic Reference 
Manual - Preface vii and Appendix Fl for 
further information. 



CYLINDERS*.. 

5 REfl *& CVLINDERS %t 

£ REfl tZ by phi i Griffin $# 

lfl GRAPHICS SiSETOJLGR 4,1,bjy=3 

15 X=@: ¥1=188 

26 R=liB=15!C=U60SU8 lS@ 

25 R=15sB=liO-l:60SUB 100!ft=i0 

39 FOR T-iS TO 58 STEP 18 

35 V1=V1-10:GQSUB i@0: NEXT V 

40 FOR K=i TO 3: FOR Z=0 TO 3 
45 3ETCGLQR 4jZ,@ 

5tf rjH T-i. ID 1880: NEXT T 
55 NEXT 2* NEXT K:GGTG 10 
LOO FOR K=fl TO B ST£P C 
110 K1=K':IF K>1£ THEN Ki=12 
L20 COLOR 15HOPLQT X,V-2-Kls3 
130 DfiBHTQ X*V+Kl/3: COLOR K 
L4M FLO i X#¥+1-N<1V3 
156 DRBHTG ^.¥l+K1^3:K=K+i 
L&O n£XT K: RETURN 



Issue 1 



PAGE 6 



18 



Club Call 



CLUB CALL will feature news from BOG. 
As the magazine gets bigger we are happy 
to set aside pages for news of other user 
groups but in order to get a bigger 
magazine we need a bigger circulation so 
it is up to Club Secretaries and members 
everywhere to subscribe and contribute. 

BUG is the Birmingham User Group - an 
independent Atari Computer Club and at 
present meets on the 2nd & 4th Thursday 
of the month at the Matador Public House 
in the Bull Ring, Birmingham City Centre. 
There are presently around 100 members 
and we are still growing! Our meetings 
so far have been very well attended and 
we will soon settle down to a regular 
format allowing everybody to join in 
activities which suit them. Probably 
various special - interest groups will be 
founded within the Club and it will be up 
to them to write for this column. 

At present it is too early in our 
development to bring specific news so we 
would like to hear from other User Groups 
in the hope that our members will be able 
to contact other users and bring news 
from afar as well as from within. 

Club member Andrew Jones has written a 
superb program "advertising" the Club and 
its Newsletter, but the program is 
unfortunately too long to print. Andrew 
doesn't even own an Atari - he borrowed 
one and wrote his program inside two 
weeks I Try and get a look at it, it's 
quite a superb piece of work. I have a 
feeling that Andrew is going to become 
one of the Club's top programmers. 
Anyone like to buy him a machine? 



Try this 



As far as the U.K. goes I have tried to 
contact various other User groups but 
have met with an alarming lack of 
enthusiasm! I am sure that there are many 
other Atari users around who would like 
to join BUG or subscribe to PAGE 6. Our 
members and our magazine welcome contact 
with other groups, so - get in contact t 

Atari say that there are some 30 user 
groups in the UK I They are supposed to 
be circulating a list but if it arrives 
with the same regularity as the Atari 
Connection we will never get in touch 
with each other! Start writing to PAGE 6 
right away. 



Type GRAPHICS 3 in Direct Mode then 
press RETURN. Press the TAB key about 25 
times then press RETURN, Now try hitting 
various different keys. 

Quite strange isn't it? I know what it 
does - can somebody tell me why? 



ACE of Oregon has already been 
mentioned elswhere in this issue but 
deserve another mention as their 
Newsletter Editor, Hike Dunn was the 
first to respond to this Editor's plea 
for help in starting off PAGE 6. The 
folks in America seem to be much more 
into helping each other out and I hope 
that Mike's quick response will spark off 
the same sort of enthusiam in BUG & 
elswhere in England. 

ACE welcome overseas members and you can 
join by sending an international Money 
Order for $20.00 to Atari Computer 
Enthusiasts, 3662, Vine Maple Dr. Eugene 
Oregon, OR97401, USA. For your 
membership you will receive by Airmail 
about 10 issues of ACE Newsletter per 
year and will probably make many new 
friends in the States, 




ft uml -f» SEneosiy . 



SOFTCELL LTD 



plays Santa Claus this 
year to Atari 400* owners 




We are very excited to announce the arrival of a full-stroke 

typewriter Keyboard which completely replaces the Atari 400* 

touch-sensitive keyboard. Extremely easy to install, it uses 

proper typewriter keys, not calculator keys, and features all 

Atari* function keys at an amazingly low retail price of £79.95. 

Available from the following retailers, who also stock a com- 
prehensive range of Softcell Limited third -party Atari software: 






Gemini Electronics 
50 he wton Street 
Piccadilly, Manchester 
Tek 061-236 3083 

Hi-Fi Western Ltd 
52 Cambrian Road 

Newport, G went 
Tel. 0653 62790 



Mays Hi-Fi Ltd 

27 Churchgate 

Leicester 

Tel. 0353 56662 

Mkro-Spot 
15 Moorftelds 

Liverpool, Lanes 
Tel. 05 1-2366628 



norma n Audio 
51 rishergate 
Preston, Lanes 
Tel. 0772 53057 

R,E,W, Computers Ltd 

114-U6CharingKRd 
London WC2 
Tel. 01-240 3586 



5herwoods 

G reat Western A read e 
Birmingham 2 
Tel. 02 1-23 6 72 11 

Silica Shop Ltd 

1-4 The Mews, Hatherley 

Rd, 5idcup, ttent 

Tel. 01-509 UH 



Silicon Centre 
7 Anbgua Street 

Edinburgh 

Tel. 03 1-557 4546 

Trionic 

144 5tation Road 
Marrow, Middlesex 
Tel. 01 8610036 



or by direct mail order from us; 

SOFTCELL LTD 

26 (5 reat Corn bow, Halesowen, West 
Midlands B63 3AE. Tel. 021-550 5063 



Please allow 28 
days for delivery 



El 



Dealer enquiries 
will be welcomed 



"Atari and Atari 400 are registered trademarks of Atari Inc. 



M 

ATARI 



Ealisto Computers Ltd. 



JOHNBRjGH] _STREET BIRMINGHAM 021-6 32 6458 

SPECIAL OFFER-DECEMBER ONLY 

! 10 / OFF ALL SOFTWARE ! 
on production of this ad, 



^ 



ATARI 400 with Basic 
language 249.95 
without Basic languaqe 
£199.95 



ATARI 



ATARI 800 

with Basic language 16K 

£499,95 



ATARI 810 

Disc Drive with DOS II 

£299.95 



ATARI410 
Cassette Recorder 
£49.99 



ATARI 400 48 K 
16K BASIC £299.99 



GAMES 

ASTEROIDS 
BASKETBALL 
MFSSILE COMMAND 
PAG-MAN 
SPACE INVADERS 
SUPER BREAKOUT 
CENTIPEDE 

SUBMARINE COMMANDER 
JUM60 JET PILOT 
SOCCER 
KICKBACK 
MOUNTAIN SHOOT 
DEFLECTIONS 
ANGLE WORMS 
LUNAR LANDER 
REARGUARD 
REARGUARD 
JAW BREAKER 
FROGGER 
PROTECTOR 
CHICKEN 
DODGE RACER 
KRAZY SHOOTOUT 
SHOOTING GALLERY 
RACE IN SPACE 
GHOST HUNTER 
GHOST HUNTER 
ALIEN SWARM 
ALIEN SWARM 
HOTFOOT 
GALACTIC CHASE 
GALACTIC CHASE 
AIR STRIKE 
AIR STRIKE 
SHAM US 
NAUTILUS 

CLOWNS 6 BALLOONS 
TUMBLLBUGS 
TRACK ATTACK 
PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY 
CANYON CLIMBEfl 
SHOP LIFTER 
PREPPIE 
APPLE PANIC 
SLIME 
SNOOKER & 
BILLIARDS 
DARTS 

GHOST ENCOUNTERS 
FIGUftEFUN 

COMPUTE 4 and REVERSI 
OWARI & BOLL & COW 
EASTERN FRONT 



ATARI 800 

with Basic language 48K 

£579.95 



UPGRADES 

for ATARI 400 

32K £75.00 48 K £99.95 



ROM 
hCM 
ROM 
ROM 
ROM 
ROM 
ROM 
ROM 
ROM 
ROM 
ROM 
16k (c) 
16k fc) 
16k (c) 
24*. {:) 
ifik fc) 
32k (d) 
16Mcqj<J) 
fc or d) 
32k (c or d) 
16k (c or d) 
16k (c or d) 
ROM 
16k (c) 
16k (c) 
16k to 
32k fd] 
16k (c) 
32k W 
16k (c) 
16k fc] 
32k (rj) 
tfik (c) 
32k fd) 

16kte)or32k(d) 

32kfcofd) 

16k (c or d) 

24k(tj) 

32k (d) 
16k (c) or 32k fd) 
m. {c) or 32k fd) 

4Bk 'd'' 
16k (c) or 32k (d) 

32k fd} 

24k fc) 



£29.95 
£24 SO 
£29.95 
£23.95 
E29.96 
£24.50 
£29.99 
£34.99 
£34.93 
£29.99 
£29.99 
£12.50 
£12.50 
£12.50 
£12.50 
£16.50 
£16.50 
£23.96 
£31.50 
[23.00 
£23.00 
£19.25 
£29,95 
£16.75 
£16.75 
£19.95 
£19.95 
£21.95 
£25.50 
£7.50 
£15.96 
£20.25 
£19.95 
£19.95 
£21 bO 
£21.30 
£21.80 
£21.30 
£21.80 
£21 .SO 
£21 JO 
£21.80 
£19.95 
£21.80 
£21,80 



16k (c) £19.99 

16k (c) £19.99 
16k (c) Of 32k (d) £19.95 

16*. (C) £14.99 

16k fc) £14.99 

16k fc) £14.99 

16k I'c) £24.5C 



ADVENTURE GAMES 

ADVENTURELAND 24k fc) £16.50 

PIRATE ADVENTURE 24k fc) £16.50 

MISSION IMPOSSIBLE 2*k fc £16.50 

VOODOO CASTLE 24k fc) £16.50 

THE COUNT 24k fc) £16 50 

STRANGE ODYSSEY 24k fc £16.56 

MYSTERY FUNHOUSE 24k fc £16.50 

PYRAMID OF DOOM 24k C £16,50 

GHOST TOWN 24k c £16.50 

SAVAGE ISLAND PART I 24k c) £16.50 

SAVAGE ISLAND PART II 24k fc) £16.50 

GOLDEN VOYAGE 24k h) £16.50 

ZORK I 32k fd) £30.96 

70 RK II 32* fd) £30.95 

DEADLINE 32k (d £39.50 

BOMB HUNTER 16k (c) £17.96 

CAVES OF DEATH 32* {cj £19 -^ 

GAMES SOFTWARE 

COMPUTER CHESS ROM £24.50 

VIDEO EASEL ROM £24.50 

STAR FLITE 32k fc) £16,50 

STAR FLITE 40k fd £20.25 

SUNDAY GOLF 16k (c) £12.50 

GALACTIC TRADER 32k fc) £16-50 

GALACTIC EMPIRE 3?k fc) £16.50 

MISSION ASTEROID 40k fd) £22,25 

WIZARD & PRINCESS 40k fd) £29.50 
ULYSSES & THE GOLDEN 

FLEECE 40k (d) £31.95 

CROSSFIRE 32k (d) £23.95 

MOUSATTACK 32k fd) £31.50- 

THRESHOLD 4flKfd) £31.95 

ACTION QUEST 16k ft) Of 32k (d) £19.56 

ANALOG ADVENTURE ' 32k (d) £18.99 

CRYPTS OF TERROR 16k (c) £21.95 

CRYPTS OF TERROR 32k (d) £25.50 

CRUSH. CRUMBLE, CHOMP 32k (c) £22.45 

RICOCHET 16k fc) £14.95 

STAR WARRIOR 32k (c) £29.95 

TEMPLE OF APSHAI 32k (c) £29.95 

UPPER REACHES OF APSHAI 32k (c £14.95 

RESCUE AT RIG EL 32k fc £22.45 

INVASION ORION 24k c £10.75 

DATESTONES OF RYN 32k fc £14.95 

IVLHDER A" AWESCM FALL 1G.dc) E12.85 

"OJ-iNAHEMT « BALL POOL 16k Cj £19-50 

DARTS 16k fc) £19.50 

CRIBBAGE & DOMINOES 16k fc) £19.50 

BRITISH JIGSAW PUZZLES 16k fc) £19.50 

EUROPEAN JIGSAW POMES 16k (t) £19.50 

NURSERY RHYMES I 16k fc) £19,50 

NURSEiRY RHYMES II 16k (c) £19-50 



850 

Interface Module 

£135.00 



ACCESSORIES 

16k RAM (BOO) 
16k RAM BOARD (BOO) 
32k RAM PACK (SOD) ' 
32k UPGRADE 1400) 
DOS 2 MASTER DISKETTE 

BOOKS AND MANUALS 

DE-RA ATARI 

MASTER MEMORY MAP 

GENERAL SOFTWARE 

WORD PROCESSOR 
INVITATION TO PROGRAMMING 1 
INVITATION TO PROGRAMMING 3 
CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH 
CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN 
CONVERSATIONAL ITALIAN 
CONVERSATIONAL SPANISH 
MINI WORD PROCESSOR 32k (c) 
KIDS 1 16k fc) 
KIOS II 16k (c) 
BOBS BUSINESS 16k (c) 
GRAPHICS MACHINE d) 
PLAYER PIANO t&k [C 
MICROPAINTER 4&k fd) 

GRAPHIC MASTER 40k fd) 

GRAPHIC GENERATOR 32k fd) 

SAM. 32k (it) 

ABUSE 48k fd) 

HOME FINANCIAL 

MANAGEMENT 16k (c) 

MICROSOFT BASIC 48k (d) 

TUTORIALS 

DISPLAY LISTS 16k (c) 
HORIZONTAL & VERTICAL 

SCROLLING 
PAGE FLIPPING 
BASICS OF ANIMATION 
PLAYER MISSILE 

GRAPHICS 
SOUNDS 

BUSINESS AND UTILITIES 

GCA DATA MANAGEMENT 

TEXT WIZARD 

3-D SUPERGRAPHICS 40k 

K-DOS 

Macro Assembler 

Machine Language Monitor 

Monkey Wrencti fSOOonly) 
Memory tesl 



16k (c) 
16k c 
16k (c) 

32k (c) 
16k fc) 

m 

m 

fc or d) 

4Dk(c; 
40k fd 

ROM 
16k (c) 



£40.00 
£65.00 
£1 15.00 
£69.95 
£21.95 



£16.00 
£495 



£99.95 
£15.95 
£22.95 
£3095 
£39.95 
£39.95 
£39.95 
£9.95 
£9.95 
£9.95 
£9.95 
£13.50 
£9,95 
£25.50 
£29.10 
£18.20 
£43.76 
£14.50 

£19.99 
ES9.89 



£13.95 

£13.95 
£'3.95 
£13.95 

£19.95 
£13.95 

£101.00 
£99.95 
£39.99 
£53.95 
£51.50 
£55.50 
£25.95 
£30.96 
£51,50 
£7.95 



I" 



To: CALISTO COMPUTERS LTD, 1 19 JOHN BRIGHT STREET BIRMINGHAM 
PLEASE ACCEPT MY ORDER FOR THE FOLLOWING PflOGRAMS.;- 
1. ... 

2 &asp»(ch to 



EaKsto Computers Lid. 



Mima: . 
Addrv&&: 



Chaque No , t or £. 

Please dabit rny credit card ACCES5WISA No 



enclosed. 

SPECIALISTS IN MICROCOMPUTERS AND SOFTWARE 
PhOmontonwvlconwanOZl^XEMSB c, nnari "9 JOHN BRIGHT STREET, BIRMINGHAM Bl 1BE 






Dear Reader, 

Thank you for baying a copy of Page 6. I hope you enjoy reading the 
magazine - please write to me with your views. 

The magazine has been put together by a few Atari enthusiasts to try 
and establish a good U.K. magazine which will enable Atari owners to share their 
Jaiowledge and enjoyment of Atari oonputers. Page 6 is intended to be a "user 1 
magazine purely to promote interest in Atari computing. It will not make vast 
profits - all monies will be ploughed back to make the magazine bigger and better. 

YOU can ensure the mgazine's future in the following ways:- 

SUPPQRT OUR ADVERTISERS - they were willing to support the 
magazine without seeing the first copy. Buy seme software from 
them or write for their catalogues. PLEASE MAKE SURE YOU TELA, 
THEM THAT YOU SAW THEIR AD IN PAGE 6. 

SUBSCRIBE to the mgazine - this way we will have a better idea 
of how many people are really interested. 

WRITE FOR THE MAGAZINE - we are totally dependent on user support. 
Articles, programs, letters are all welcomed, indeed are MECESSARY 
for the magazines survival. 

I look forward to hearing from you - please write. If you require a 
reply or would like articles or programs returned, please enclose a s.a.e. or 
sufficient postage. 

Enjoy your Atari, ^ minghan . ^